ha! the “new” boro

Speaking of trends…without any real understanding of the thought behind it.  But let’s be cool, let’s be hip. Let’s make believe boro!

made in China, Indonesia, or Vietnam apparently.  Remember when these were made in the US and didn’t cost $100+?

Japanese vintage boro huh?

After having been to the Amuse Boro Museum last month this sort of thing really leaves me cold. If you go there and feel the energy of those pieces, of the passage of time, the hardships, the heart and everything else they engender, I doubt you would be making a joke of it all by making faux shoes like these.  These shoes seem to be the anti-boro.

Seems sacrilegious to me.  Boro my ass.

 

Indigo fermentation vat

So if you want to really talk sustainable here’s something for you.

Handmade lace from France -probably 70 to 75 years old.

Dyed of course in the indigo fermentation vat.
I wonder how many people in the US are using a fermentation vat year round.

Of course, indigo looks great any time even when it’s not trendy.

By the looks of what I see there, I’ll be looking forward to when the trend wears off and we can get down to real indigo.

 

where to go from here…

wondering…

every day I wonder.
yesterday I wondered how the vat was doing-since I had not dyed anything for 3 days while I entertained and cooked for a crowd of graduates and other guests. a party.
so,

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it was doing just fine. I think I missed it more than it missed me.

The Long Beach Quilt Festival is next week. It will be the last one held here. They are moving on to greener pastures it seems. I will be there-booth #1315 I think… also teaching a flower class with some needle felting of the Shibori ribbon.

I am wondering how much longer the shows can remain a financially viable vehicle for me to get my work out there.

The new show they are replacing it with will be in Portland and of course require travel expenses in addition. But no paid teaching opportunities to help offset the cost. Only quick unpaid seminars/ demos on the show floor. Doubt I can justify that. Will have to think on that one.

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doing nothing is harder than doing something

a place to rest your mind...a distant shore

a place to rest your mind…a distant shore

Letting things fall into place or even fall apart before taking action can be one of the most difficult things to do. I am in that situation at the moment-and so far have resisted action. I realize that what I can do or want to do to alter the situation likely won’t have the intended result. Wanting to “do” something is culturally ingrained in us it seems. At least then we can say we “did our best” or “tried”. It might shield us from criticism or guilt. A wait and see approach is not highly valued these days. We are penalized for seemingly “doing nothing”.

An interesting study regarding soccer titled “Action bias among elite soccer goalkeepers: The case of penalty kicks” explores the emotional reactions to action vs. inaction.

While that might seem somewhat offtrack here, I makes me think of the differences between “instant indigo” and the fermentation vat. The fermentation vat gives me time to process the next move. To wait and see. To build upon what previously was. A chemical vat can be zapped back into action quickly while the fermentation vat needs time. Time to wait and see…

So while I let things fall apart a bit, I’ll be “doing something” out at the vats.

weaving motifs into cloth (and life)

There are certain motifs that have always captured my attention.  Of course you know the moon is one of these motifs but the other two that captivate me are water and cloud imagery.  Who hasn’t laid back and watched the clouds move across the sky, felt the sun come and go across our skin…listened to the waves, a nearby stream, a roaring river or waterfall…seen the moon rise and fall?  I like that these motifs are universal and shared across the globe regardless of where or who you are.  It reminds me of life’s beauty, and our connectedness to each other. These things give me perspective.

I think this is why these nature based motifs have been given so much regard in design over time and space.  Often each motif is imbued with a special meaning or symbology. I enjoy studying all the meanings behind the motifs and the cultures which bestowed these interpretaions.

I recently was very taken with old silk which had these images woven into the design.  I purchased a couple of rolls of these silks from second hand shops recently with a few things in mind.  First, to study them and then to create something out of them.

japanese vintage silk damask -indigo dyed

japanese vintage silk damask -indigo dyed

Aside from the cloud and water motifs, this one has bamboo, maple leaves and what looks to be cherry blossoms.  Sort of covers it all!  Originally, this sort of fabric was used for nagajuban -the ankle length under kimono which used the softest and finest silks worn next to the skin.  The weight and design complexity of this silk suggests that it was to be used in a nagajuban worn for a very formal occasion. It has a beautiful hand and a lovely drape.

I saw moons in it of course…

silk moons for the supermoon

silk moons for the supermoon

flowers on the moon-indigo and silk

flowers on the moon-indigo and silk

I used a piece of this fabric for a nice indigo dyed scarf with diagonal ends and hand stitched hems- ombre dyed on one side. I think I will add an interesting bead to the two points…

indigo scarf

I finally completed a little shop update that includes the following items- enjoy! Most items ship free with any other item.  Now back to the studio to finish up a couple orders that need to go out asap!

each day, one at a time

Just have to add this here if you haven’t seen it yet. If so, it’s worth viewing more than once.

And if you missed the video of her I shot in 2011-

Richard had translated for me back then-

Richard says:
Yup, it’s really interesting. Someone asks her how long she’s been at it. She answers she’s been doing it for 81 years now, and that when they all started, kids started in elementary school back then. She says they competed to be the best, from even such an age. And that back then there were lots of “shokunin”, or craftsmen(and women, I imagine), 100 or more. She says she’s from Narumi. She goes on to reveal that her age is 92 and that the woman next to her is 2 years older yet(like it’s some contest or something)

And after a second listening he adds:
OOps, she’s been doing it for 83 years. Back then, you started when you started elementary school. They competed to remember different techniques and patterns. There were 120 patterns that had to be remembered, but now there are only 70 or so that are done, the others having been abandoned. She says she did a lot of work back then as a student, and then restates herself to emphasize the amt (like “I did a ton!”)

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