uh oh…

I learned a lesson (well, probably more than one) recently when I casually mentioned to a friend that I had been keeping an eye out for a small floor loom, cheap. There was no rush and just like most things I was willing to wait for something to just come my way. The timing was right and this friend had seen one at a second hand shop and went back to check it out again. I’ll spare you the details but after texting me a few photos and negotiating a very low price, she had it delivered to me! It needs some cleaning up and a little refurbing but nothing really drastic that I can see. Another weaver friend approved of the photos and the price and sent them along to her friend who came back with a very good and detailed process to get this cleaned up and back in useful condition. Thank you Janice and Joe!
Lesson: Be careful what you wish for and what you casually mention to Carolyn!
There are no markings on this loom so maybe a homebuilt piece. The footprint is about 30″x 32″ and will fit nicely into the space where my son’s vibes now occupy (hint, hint). Vibes will be moved upstairs…
Any comments or suggestions from weavers welcomed! What I am aiming for in the beginning is to weave some sakiori.

Recently I saw a video on Vimeo that showed Hiroshi Murase demonstrating te kumo shibori and I saw something in his hand movements that caught my eye and opened up a more efficient way to do tekumo. I was going to link the the video here but it appears to have been taken down (it was previously public). I saw it in an online advertisement for the WSN/Slow Fiber workshop coming up where this technique will be covered. Looks like it would be of interest to anyone who wants to practice this particular technique. I have taught this technique in workshops at the JANM but I never felt I was really good at it. I could accomplish a good end result but I always felt that I was not being very adept or efficient while doing it. So after seeing his technique, I knew what I was missing! I have been practicing it all week and returned to do some of the work I did way back then but had decided it was too time consuming (and annoying) -at least the way I was doing it before. I then went in search of another video to show this technique and discovered that the Shibori Museum in Kyoto has been very busy during the pandemic producing shibori videos- they are so very interesting! Here is the one on tekumo. Check out the rest of their channel! It’s pretty amazing! I spent a whole day watching and catching up on the videos there that I had not seen.

Here are a few of the early results…

I am experimenting with creating more textural pieces- I really have always been drawn to shibori for the sculptural aspects (hence all the pleating I’ve done over the years) and the silk organza just loves to be shaped!
I also pleated up and dyed some new ribbons for the shop…added back the scrap bags too-I hadn’t realized they have been out of stock.

9 thoughts on “uh oh…

  1. arlee

    There was an artist (i don’t remember the name) who would take printed wholecloth, cut into strips then weave with it in order the strips were cut. The design became elongated somewhat and more graphic.

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  2. Lisa Hoesing

    HiThis was fun.I do Saori weaving.When I began, I found it helpful to buy a ready made warp from Saori.Then after a bit of practice weaving, I bough a warping frame and made my own warps.Have fun with your new loomLisa

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  3. Carol

    I remember how excited/interested you were when Sharon took us to meet her elderly friend who had a big loom. This makes perfect sense to me based on that experience. I’m all eyes and ears waiting to see what you create. I’ll be practicing patience, but 👀👂👂👀👂👂

    Liked by 1 person

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