more on the spirit of a thing…

Today and yesterday was a combination of things.  Saturday and Sunday is the Shibori Fusion  workshop at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles.  There might be a spot of two left but you will have to check with them. Sign ups are through the museum.  So that means a lot of preparation this week.

We are focusing on using silk and color (as opposed to the indigo workshops I often teach there).  I could have just ordered silk and been done with it, but I see these workshops as an opportunity for teaching more than just shibori dyeing.   So in that spirit, the last couple of days have been busy taking apart old silk kimono and nagajuban.

silk

These are some in progress of dismantling. Such careful stitching, some even sewn with twisted silk thread. Handsewn french seams…the drape of the silk…the sheerness of the lining silks.  Each one yields 12-13 meters and if lined twice that of two different silks. a few stains here and there but nothing that will be noticed after dyeing. In any case these will be pieces that will be practiced on and hopefully used in a future project.   So a day spent with these pieces pulling threads, ironing and organizing- all the time thinking about how we will be dyeing them.  No need for new fabrics when these ones already exist.  I hope to build an appreciation in the participants for these fabrics.  After sorting, cutting, ironing and bundling-they really are lovely!

kimono silk bundles ready for eager dyers!

kimono silk bundles ready for eager dyers!

Most of these are from interior kimono and nagajuban so are off white or very pale in color-easily over-dyed. They are also very soft as they were to be worn close to the skin as opposed to the outer kimono layers.  They have their own spirit from previous owners and the spirit of each dyer will add their own imprint to the cloth.

Other things going on here include the shipping of lots of orders. I put out a lot of silk shibori ribbon scrap bags this week to clear out the scrap box.  Thanks to all who ordered the scrap samples to play and create with- Buddy overseas all the final inspection of orders here:

I closed the etsy shop until next week- need a little break from that to concentrate on the workshop and wholesale orders for a bit – look for it to reopen in a week…or so. I have some fun little ideas I also want to play with and need a little mental space in which to do it.  I hope I can find some!

In addition, I finally heard back from the city on their approval of my re-landscaping plan which conforms to their Lawn to Garden water saving plan.  So I went to Home Depot to buy some heavy black plastic which I will lay down and cover with free mulch from the city yard to kill off the lawn- or what is left of it.  It will take at least a month to kill off this way but worth it. Apparently, most everyone else will be doing it another way and Home Depot has stocked up to take advantage:

Apparently we never learn…

I know I promised an introduction to Squirrelly Gurl for those who haven’t yet met her but this got in the way first.  Next time-for sure.

 

10 thoughts on “more on the spirit of a thing…

  1. Barbara Fox

    I stopped buying all weed killing products especially Round-Up. It’s been proven very bad for humans… Glad you are going the plastic way for killing the lawn. At Christmas, I was going to use an old linen tablecloth of my mom’s. Have used it several years but this year it needed some hemming done. It was then that I noticed that it was badly worn. So, it sits, folded in my linen closet, waiting for a dye session, possibly. Will embroider and give to my girls as a keepsake of sorts. Thought of you when I discovered this well-worn piece…

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    1. shiborigirl Post author

      it’s kinda crazy that so many consumers buy this stuff. it’s so bad,bad, bad. it almost seems that in order to qualify for the rebate $ to convert your lawn to drought tolerant plants they should require you kill it off “softly” instead of nuke it. they like to promote all these plants that attract bees and butterflies yet they don’t discourage the use of these harmful chemicals. makes no sense whatsoever.

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  2. zibergirl

    We killed our lawn by covering it with cardboard from opened up boxes. Cover grass completely, wet cardboard, and then cover with 6-8 inches of wood chips. The grass and the cardboard will eventually decompose and create good soil under the chips. You could then plant a few water resistant plants here and there is you desire. I wouldn’t buy the plastic, it does’t break down.

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    1. shiborigirl Post author

      roadside weedkillers have been proven to be a big contributor to the decline of pollinator insects such as bees and butterflies. you can’t explain this stuff to some folks. all they can think about is curb appeal and property values.

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  3. teresa trask

    Hi, took your class at the Japanese American National Museum in LA. I needed to know what the stencil ink/liquid is, used for the Arimatsu stencil pattern marking type of process.I can use it, sew, then it washes out.When I was there I didn’t write it down and am having a hard time finding it. If you can tell me where to get it, I would appreciate it ten fold.I think it would be an easier process then trying to use these little washable pens they sell everywhere. They are annoying..Would appreciate the help,

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