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tiny_dancer1.jpg

Once upon a time, in a sculpture studio in Long Beach, Ca., I did historical restoration with my first husband, Brian Coleman. This sculpture and fountain, which is installed outside Bovard Auditorium on the USC campus was most definitely the most difficult thing we ever did. In the years following this work, we often recalled this job whenever anything got tough, and reminded ourselves that nothing could ever be as difficult as the USC piece. It got us through a lot of tough times. The original , was delivered to us in a dump truck to our studio in over 100 pieces, much of it missing. We resculpted it from photos and built a massive mold containing hundreds of intricate pieces. We then disassembled it, took it to a cement company, rebuilt the mold, inverted it with a crane, (prayed alot) and then poured in the cement-tons of it! Upon de- molding, we had it transported to the site and installed it. We also re-made the bowl with all the necessary copper tubing and fittings for the waterworks as well as recasting the bronze figure on top. Brian was a genius at this and I was the studio “assistant”. Just the two of us for 6 months 80 hours a week..I was 19 at the time. Since he passed away in 1985 from leukemia, I’ve always treasured this piece. This photo was taken by USC student, Andrew Hart whom I paid for the rights to use his image here.

8 thoughts on “more…

  1. jude

    what an amazing project to be involved with. a great “solid” memorial to memory.
    parts of an unknown story have emerged here. were you married at age 19?

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  2. shiborigirl Post author

    no, we were living in sin (ha!) seriously tho- he was a sculptor and i a ceramist and we met on a project. discovered we liked working together and moved in together when i was 19. we started a biz, incorporated it, bought a house and THEN decided to get married 5 years later.

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  3. Zena Herbert

    It’s interesting that working in clay and the joys/miseries of glaze chemistry can lead to textiles and dyeing. That’s the same route I’ve taken. Thank you for sharing; I wish you a peaceful, serene 2012.

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  4. shiborigirl Post author

    i should have mentioned it long ago- one of the scenes in the movie The Graduate with Dustin Hoffman was filmed at the edge of this fountain. One day I was watching it and noticed! Of course it was filmed before the lightening strike and was interesting for me to see the original like that.

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  5. Diana Blanchard

    I was a dyer years ago, then went into ceramics. That sent me into acrylics. Now that I’m in my mid 50s, and a major turning point in my life, I find myself back at the beginning of my creative life. I’ve started dying again, and you, talented lady, inspire me to keep on going. Thank you.

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